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1950s dating etiquette

A lot of the people I matched with were both intrigued and terrified by my upfront attitude regarding my objective.When I told people I was on Tinder looking for long-term commitment, I was met with more "lols" than "me too"s.

They tend to believe that woman should just understand the nature of these sites and not be disappointed when they say that they're actually just in town from Australia for the weekend and looking for some American booty.Instead of bringing people together for committed relationships, Tinder just gave people a lift over the horizon to see more fish in the sea.And so for every awkward first date, there was a better option a swipe away.In the 1950s, long before the days of cell phones and social networking, dating was a simple affair that revolved around jukeboxes, soda fountains and well-defined social norms.Dating rituals dictated the proper ways for men to court women, with marriage being the desired outcome for couples that were "going steady." Men and women of the era adhered to these rituals--or else were considered the societal fringe. 9, 2009, "Miami Quarterly Online" article, "Dating Through the Ages," Miami University American Studies Associate Professor Helen Sheumaker notes that in the 1950s, the economy dictated men and women's dating roles.Young women would sell themselves to men in two sentences or less: "Young woman, age 20, attractive, refined, regular income, object: matrimony." Back in the '50s women were encouraged to take nothing short of long-term commitment and respect for a man.

There was no time or social standard for small talk and dates over watered-down cocktails for four weeks before moving onto another cocktail and another man.

Among the many things I found shocking, was the no-nonsense attitude towards dating.

It was common in the early to mid 1900s for both men and women to put up personal ads in the local paper.

Karen Spaeder began her editorial career at Entrepreneur magazine.

True to the entrepreneurial spirit, she works at a startup digital marketing firm, blogs at karenspaeder.com, teaches yoga and runs her own organic beauty business.

While the app calls itself a dating service, it's really more effectively geared towards nightcap partners and two-night stands and a lot of making and canceling of plans.