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There was a backlash and the band later apologized.Recode spoke with Evans about her book and the overlooked figures in tech’s past. A more personal reason is, I grew up on the computer — my dad worked for Intel and I had computers in my home from a very young age.

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It’s just true stories of people doing amazing stuff against extenuating circumstances and succeeding.Evans, who writes about technology for Vice’s Motherboard, spent two years digging up archives and tracking down subjects to add to the canon of internet pioneers.Her writing was a welcome retreat from Evans’s other life as lead singer in an arty rock band with her partner, Jona Bechtolt.I always defined myself as an internet person and a net native. But I got to a point, I don’t know, maybe three or four years ago, where I started to feel like, as a person and more importantly as a woman, I didn’t really know what my place was anymore.I didn’t feel as free to express myself on the internet as I had when I was younger.That’s why Evans set out to highlight the women who helped make the internet in her new book, “Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet,” a series of biographical essays about important women in tech history the Wall Street Journal called “engaging,” while also “too-often fannish,” in its review.

Evans followed the stories of women in computing that span from Ada Lovelace, who published the first computer program in 1843, to cyberfeminism matriarch Sadie Plant, who inspired a generation of politically engaged women online in the early ‘90s.

That’s cool and great and those people are necessary to build things, but we also need people that can think about the impact of that and can also think about the whole thing at a higher level, how it’s all going to work, where it’s going to fit in the marketplace, where it’s going to fit in the world in which it will become a part. We’ve been a band for a really long time and done these experimental projects that play with online culture.

In May of 2016, you and your partner made headlines for orchestrating a fake sex tape leak to promote your music video. We were trying to speak to the disillusionment of clickbait and celebrity culture and the conviction with which people spread stories on the internet — the way that the algorithms and systems in place inflate and exacerbate those stories, but it was a very misguided approach. It was a disaster from the beginning and we regretted everything about it.

Many of the women in your book had rich lives outside their work in technology, and you’re the same way. We have to remember that people with well-rounded lives often have a great deal to contribute because they’re thinking about the larger systems of which they are a part.

One of the people in the book, Radia Perlman, she’s put this in my head, that we have this fantasy about engineers being people that took apart radios when they were a kid, and are obsessive about details and only think about the code.

I really want to see it reviewed and just the network as a whole and in the culture of tech as a whole.